The U.S. Senate On Climate Change


by William Achnitz III on May 13, 2015 | Views: 374 | Score: 2
Human activities significantly contribute to climate change
Voted Yes51
Voted No49
Sources: wired.com
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William Achnitz III
William Achnitz III on May 13, 2015 11:20 AM said:

The Keystone XL pipeline has been a hot environmental topic in Washington this year. During a debate, two amendments were voted on. The fact that climate change was real and not a hoax was accepted by all 100 senators. The Senate is clearly divided on whether humans are to blame though. The 51% that said we were consisted of all 44 democrats, all independents, and 5 of the 54 Republicans.

Audiodramatist
Audiodramatist on May 15, 2015 10:19 AM said:

Interestingly enough, the percentage of scientist voting yes will probably be larger. So why do we have people who don't listen to the science (for whatever reason) making laws on science centered matters?

William Achnitz III
William Achnitz III on May 15, 2015 10:25 AM said:

Well, the widely cited statistic, which is based on the science in peer-reviewed journals on the subject matter, is that 97% of climate scientists agree that human activities are a significant factor in driving climate change. We need to as citizens speak with our vote. Every senator was voted in by their constituents and they got those votes by telling us what we wanted to hear. So, we need to start listening to the science too and start voting for people that listen to it as well.

Audiodramatist
Audiodramatist on May 15, 2015 10:21 PM said:

Voting in this current reality is futile (too corruptible) though i do vote. But an even more useful exercise would be to just take the politicians out of the process as debaters; they would become the rubber-stamps they currently wish to be. In other words, policy would not be made not by interests but by expertise. I mean what can muddling middle folks like politicians or lawyers or business persons, who do not or can not read, understand or interpret facts have to be in the equation? These are life altering, planetary decisions.

William Achnitz III
William Achnitz III on May 16, 2015 3:01 PM said:

Agreed, but unfortunately the US government is not designed on that premise. I think we just need competent politicians to listen to their competent advisors rather than redesign the entire structure of the government. Doing so would probably require another revolution.

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